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Monthly Archives: November 2008

  • Ottolenghi Christmas Gifts

    As always, during the festive season we have a huge range of gift options, all home-made Ottolenghi products. On top of those, you can get a meal voucher or a signed copy of our cookbook, both wrapped with a red ribbon... so there you go, a bit of promotion on the blog shouldn't harm anyone. To create you own unique “Ottolenghi Selection” we give you a bag, tied with a ribbon and padded with red tissue (see photo below), to fill up with our goodies and give as present. Here's just a few options: Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, signed and wrapped copy - £25.00 Gift token or lunch/dinner voucher (you decide how much) Mince pie - £2.00 Ottolenghi Christmas cake (made with the best fruit and lots of alcochol) small - £14.00, medium - £22.00, large - £44.00 Machiavelli Panettone classic - £16.00, chocolate - £17.00, marrons glacé - £18.00 Christmas shaped gingerbread biscuits - £4.20 Shortbread snow flakes - £4.50 Double chocolate and hazelnut biscotti - £3.50 Amaretti biscuits - £4.90 Spicy grissini sticks with chilli and chive - £4.80 Chocolate macaroons - £7.50 White or dark chocolate brittle - £4.80 Mini chocolate or raspberry meringues - £4.90 Elizabeth David’s tomato and pimento chutney - £4.95 Cranberry and apple relish with orange and ginger - £3.90 Seasonal jams - £3.90 Mixed spicy nuts with chilli and rosemary - £4.80 Seasonal fruit cordial (to prepare hot or cold) - £3.90 Contact any of our shops by email or phone and we'll get this ready for you in no time. Happy Sweet Christmas!
  • Guardian's Christmas food supplement

    Just had a first glimpse at the Christmas food supplement that Sami and I wrote for the Guardian. It looks absolutely delicious. This exquisite 20-pager will feature our take on Christmas food, including smoked aubergine and yoghurt vol-au-vents; sumac marinated baby chicken stuffed with lamb and bulgar; sourdough, green chilli and feta stuffing; roasted pumpkin with chestnut, cinnamon and fresh bay leaves (see photo); meringue, morello cherry and rose roulade; drinks to match the food and so much more! Out on the 6th of December.
  • Malaysia, Truly Asia - Part I

    On a recent trip to Malaysia I made with Helen and Ling (both originally from Malaysian) I got a thorough peek into this incredibly multi-faceted cuisine. We ate almost only on street markets and in hawker centres, where the three main cultures that make up this nation (Malay, Chinese and Indian) display their unique dishes. Being so cheap and so incredibly fresh, you end up sampling dozens of dishes. It seems that the word “grazing” was invented for this kind of experience. You sit surrounded by a multitude of mini-kitchens that constantly create mouth watering local delicacies. How can one resist? One of my favourites was a typical fried oyster omelette, which wasn’t perfect everywhere but once in a while had just the right balance of runny and crispy, with a strong but not overbearing oyster flavour. When right, it is heavenly. Helen and Ling, proudly posing with their banana leaf wrapped nasi lemak Another obvious choice was nasi lemak, probably the most popular dish in Malaysia. Again, if done right this dish – comprised of coconut rice, chilli sauce (sambal), roasted peanuts and small dried anchovies – is as complex a delicacy as any you get in a Michelin starred restaurant. Nasi lemak also inspired a vegetarian dish I published recently in the Guardian. I highly recommend it, but only if you can take the heat. To be continued...

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