Late harvest

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Late harvest wines are made from grapes left on the vine longer than usual. Late harvest is usually an indication of a sweet dessert wine. The grapes used for late harvest wines are often more similar to raisins, but have been naturally dehydrated while on the vine.

We have selected two delicious late harvest wines to be enjoyed with cheese, chocolate and any other sweet treats:

Doron Late Harvest Marzemino from Eugenio Rosi is a sweet, spicy and rich wine – it’s the perfect match for chocolate. The grapes are harvested at the end of September and air dried in wooden boxes.
At the end of January the grapes go into stainless steel tanks for fermentation and then left unfiltered for 24 months in 2 wooden barrels – one made out of oak and one made out of cherry trees.

doron Marzemino Doron Eugenio Rosi NV, £35

 

Calprea Recioto di Soave from Filippo Filippi is a yellow-gold sweet wine made from 100% Garganega. It’s a beautifully balanced wine which is perfect with aged, hard cheeses, fruit pastries and almond biscuits. The grapes are picked at the end of September through the beginning of October. The grapes are put in wooden boxes and left to dry-out on specially made wickerwork shelves and/or suitable small wooden boxes for more than six months. The drying-out process takes place in a locality where it must have complete and constant ventilation, a good quantity of humidity, which favours the growing of the typical and researched noble mould. The dried-out grapes are pressed between the end of March and the beginning of April without the utilization of pumps but by taking advantage of a specially built un-level means of the wine cellar. The must- wine which has an elevated high grade of sugary remains is left to ferment and age in small oak-wood barrels for almost a year. Prior to bottling, only one unique decanting without filtering takes place, thus preferring a natural final decanting. 

Calprea Recioto di Soave, Filippi, £29 Calprea Recioto di Soave, Filippi, £29

 

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